Greek Mythology

Greek Mythology

In ancient times ’till now, myths and legends are preserved and studied all over the world. They can give us a perspective of the past, or through myths and legends we can take the feedback of past mistakes. Different mythologies and legends are also always the same in their core – divinity and mortality, but with the grain of salt that all power comes with levels of difficulty, moral and understanding.

But myths and legends can show us that all gods and mortals, given power, does not mean equal to wisdom – that is reserved for those that study their variations.

King Priam – Aesacus and Hesperia

King Priam – Aesacus and Hesperia

Aesacus was the son of the Trojan king Priam and the brother of the great hero Hector. He was born on the slopes of Mount Ida by the lovely nymph Alexiroya, the daughter of the river god Granik. Growing up in the mountains, Aesacus disliked the city and avoided living...

Cadmus – The Dragon Killer

Cadmus – The Dragon Killer

Cadmus (Κάδμος) is the son of the Phoenician king Agenor and the brother of Europe (the myth of Europe here). Cadmus is the founder of the city of Thebes, the acropolis is named after him - Cadmea. The historian Herodotus mentions Cadmus as a person who introduced the...

Perseus, Atlas and Andromeda Myths

Perseus, Atlas and Andromeda Myths

Perseus is moving further and further away from the island of the Gorgons. He flies across the sky like a cloud driven by a strong wind. He finally reached the country where the titan’s son Iapetus, Prometheus’ brother, the giant Atlas, reigned. Thousands of flocks of fine-wooled sheep and whirling cows and bulls grazed the Atlas fields. Magnificent orchards stretched across his estates, and among the gardens was a tree with golden branches and leaves; and the apples that this tree yielded were also golden. Atlas guarded this tree like the apple of his eye; it was his greatest treasure. The goddess Themis foretold him that one day a son of Zeus would come to him and steal his golden apples. Atlas was afraid of that. He surrounded the orchard where the golden tree grew with a high wall, and placed a dragon in front of the entrance as a guard, spewing flames. Atlas did not allow foreigners into his possessions – he feared that a son of Zeus would penetrate between them. Here that Perseus flew to Atlas with his winged sandals and addressed him with such welcoming words:

Danaus, Aegyptus and the Danaides

Danaus, Aegyptus and the Danaides

The son of Zeus and Io, Epaphus, had a son, Bell, and he had two sons, Aegyptus and Danaus. Aegyptus ruled the whole country, which the blessed Nile irrigated; in his name this country was also called Aegyptus. Danaus ruled in Libya. The gods gave Aegyptus fifty sons...

Aeacus – Judge of the Underworld

Aeacus – Judge of the Underworld

Zeus the Thunderer, after kidnapping the beautiful daughter of the river god Azop, took her to the island of Oynopia, which has since been named after Azop’s daughter Aegina. The son of Aegina and Zeus, Aeacus, was born on this island. When Aeacus grew up, matured, and became king on the island of Aegina, no one in all of Greece could compare to him in love of truth or justice. The great Olympians themselves revered Aeacus and often chose him as a judge in their disputes. After his death, Aeacus, like Minos and Radamant, became a judge in the underworld by the will of the gods.

Pandora’s Box and Merciless Consequences

Pandora’s Box and Merciless Consequences

When Prometheus stole the divine fire for mortals, taught them various arts and crafts and gave them knowledge, life on earth became happier. Zeus, angered by Prometheus’ actions, punished him severely and sent evil to the people. He commanded the glorious god, the blacksmith Hephaestus, to mix earth and water, and to make of this mixture a beautiful girl equal in power to men, to have a gentle voice and a gaze similar to that of the immortal goddesses. Zeus’ daughter Athena was to weave a beautiful garment for the girl; the goddess of love, the golden Aphrodite, was to give her a charm that no one could resist; Hermes to give her a cunning mind and dexterity.

The Great Flood in Greek Mythology – Myth

The Great Flood in Greek Mythology – Myth

Many crimes were committed by the people of the Copper Age. Arrogant and wicked, they did not obey the Olympian gods. The thunderbolt Zeus was angry with them; Zeus was especially angry with the king of Lycosura in Arcadia, Lycaon. Once Zeus came to Lycosura as an ordinary mortal. In order for the inhabitants of Lycosura to know that he was a god, Zeus gave them a sign and all the inhabitants fell prostrate before him and worshiped him as a god. Only Lycaon did not want to give Zeus divine honors and ridiculed all who worshiped Zeus. Lycaon decided to test whether Zeus was a god. He killed a hostage who was in his palace, boiled part of his body, burned another part and offered them to the great thunderbolt to eat. Zeus was terribly angry. With a flash of lightning, he destroyed Lycaon’s palace and turned it into a bloodthirsty wolf.

Five Ages of Man – Greek Mythology

Five Ages of Man – Greek Mythology

The immortal gods living on the bright Olympus created the first human race happy; this was the Golden Age. Then the god Cronus ruled in the sky. In those days, people lived like the blessed gods, knowing neither worries, nor labor, nor sorrow. They did not know the weak old age either; their legs and arms were always strong and sturdy. Their life, without disease and full of happiness, was like an eternal feast. Their death, which came after a long life, was like a peaceful, quiet sleep.

Punishment of Dionysus

Punishment of Dionysus

And in Orchomenus, in Boeotia, they did not want to recognize the god Dionysus. When the priest of Dionysus (Bacchus) appeared in Orchomenus and called on all the girls and women to go to the forests and mountains in merry mourning in honor of the god of wine, the three daughters of King Minyas refused to go to the feast: they did not want to recognize Dionysus for god. All the women of Orchomenus went out of the city into the shady forests and there sang and danced to celebrate the great god.

Apollo and Daphne Myth

Apollo and Daphne Myth

The bright, cheerful god Apollo also knows sorrow: misfortune befell him too. He knew the grief soon after his victory over Python. When Apollo, proud to have defeated Python, stood over the monster defeated by his arrows, he saw the young god of love, Eros, stretching his golden bow. Apollo told him with a laugh:

Apollo’s Punishment – Giants and Satyr

Apollo’s Punishment – Giants and Satyr

The long-range Apollo is frightening when he gets angry, and then there is no mercy of with his golden arrows. They killed many. From them perished the proud Otos and Ephialtes, sons of Aloadae, who did not want to obey anyone. From an early age, they were famous for their enormous height, strength and boundless courage. As young men, Otto and Ephialtes began to threaten the Olympian gods:

God Pan – God of the Forest – Greek Myth

God Pan – God of the Forest – Greek Myth

The god Pan could often be seen in the midst of Dionysus’ entourage. When the great Pan was born, his mother, the nymph Driopa, looked at her son, terrified, and fled. He was born with goat’s legs and horns and a long beard. But his father, Hermes, rejoiced that a son had been born to him, took him in his arms, and carried him to the bright Olympus and the gods. All the gods rejoiced loudly at the birth of Pan and laughed as they watched him.

King Midas and His Golden Curse – Greek Mythology

King Midas and His Golden Curse – Greek Mythology

Once the merry Dionysus with a noisy crowd of maenads and satyrs wandered on the tree-covered rocks of Tmol in Phrygia. Only Strong was missing from his entourage. He stayed behind and stumbled at every step, because he was quite drunk, wandering the Phrygian fields. The villagers saw him, tied him with garlands of flowers and took him to King Midas. Midas immediately recognized Dionysus’ teacher, received him respectfully in his palace, and celebrated him with lavish feasts for nine days in a row. On the tenth day, Midas personally took Strong to the god Dionysus. Dionysus rejoiced to see Strong, and allowed Midas, as a reward for the respect he had shown his teacher, to choose the gift he wanted. Then Midas shouted:

Dionysus – The Greek God of Wine

Dionysus – The Greek God of Wine

Zeus the Thunderer loved the beautiful Semela, the daughter of the Theban king Cadmus. He once promised to grant her every request, whatever it was, and swore to her with the inviolable oath of the gods in the sacred waters of the underground Styx. But the great goddess Hera hated Semela and wished to destroy her. She told Semela:

Phaeton – Son of the God Helios and Sun’s Chariot

Phaeton – Son of the God Helios and Sun’s Chariot

Only once was the established order in the world challenged, and the sun-god did not go out in his chariot to heaven to shine upon men. This is what happened. The Sun, Helios, had a son by Clemena, the daughter of the sea goddess Thetis, who was called Phaeton. Phaeton’s cousin Epaphus, the son of the thunderer Zeus, once laughed at him, telling him:

Night, Moon, Dawn and Sun – Greek Myth

Night, Moon, Dawn and Sun – Greek Myth

Slowly travels across the sky in her chariot, drawn by black horses, the goddess Night – Nukta. With her dark veil she has swept the earth. Darkness has enveloped everything. Near the chariot of the goddess Night the stars are crowded and an uncertain flickering light pours on the earth – these are the young sons of the goddess Dawn – Eos, and of Astrey.

Goddess Demeter’s Blessed and Cursed

Goddess Demeter’s Blessed and Cursed

The great goddess Demeter, who gives fertility to the earth, taught people how to cultivate fertile fields. She gave the young son of the Eleusinian king, Triptolemus, wheat seeds, and he first plowed the Rary field near Eleusis with a plow three times and threw the seeds into the dark earth. A rich harvest yielded the fields blessed by Demeter herself. In a wonderful chariot drawn by the wings of dragons, Triptolemus, by order of Demeter, flew around all the countries and taught people agriculture everywhere.

Goddess Demeter and Daughter – Persephone

Goddess Demeter and Daughter – Persephone

The great goddess Demeter had a young, beautiful daughter, Persephone. Persephone’s father was the great son of Cronus himself, the Thunderer Zeus. Once upon a time, the beautiful Persephone, along with her oceanid friends, played carefree in the blossoming Nise Valley. Like a light-winged butterfly, the young daughter of Demetrius came running from flower to flower. She plucked gorgeous roses, fragrant violets, snow-white lilies and red hyacinths (hyacinths). Persephone was carelessly mad, not knowing what fate her father Zeus had ordained for her. De could think that she would not see the clear sunlight again soon, that she would not soon enjoy the flowers and inhale their sweet scent. Zeus gave her in marriage to his gloomy brother Hades, the ruler of the realm of the shadows of the dead, and with him she was to live in the darkness of the underworld, deprived of the light of the scorching southern sun.

Hephaestus – God of Fire, Symbol of the Forge

Hephaestus – God of Fire, Symbol of the Forge

Hephaestus, son of Zeus and Hera, god of fire, blacksmith god, with whom no one can compete in blacksmithing, was born on the bright Olympus. He was born a weak and cripple child. Hera was angry when she was shown the god, the ugly, emaciated son. She grabbed him and dragged him from Olympus down to the distant land.

Eros and his Arrows – Greek God of Erotics

Eros and his Arrows – Greek God of Erotics

The beautiful Aphrodite reigns over the world. And she, like the thunderer Zeus, has a messenger. Through him she carries out her will. This messenger of Aphrodite is her son Eros, a cheerful, insidious, and sometimes cruel boy. Eros flies on its shining, golden wings over lands and seas, fast and light as a breeze. He holds a small golden bow in his hands and carries an archer with arrows on his shoulder.

Ares – Greek God of War

Ares – Greek God of War

The god of war, the fierce Ares, is the son of the thunderer Zeus and Hera. Zeus does not love him. He often tells his son that he is the most hated of the Olympian gods. Zeus does not love his son because of his bloodthirstiness. Had Ares not been his son, he would have long ago thrown him into gloomy Tartarus, where the Titans are tormented. Only fierce battles delight Ares’ heart. He rages furiously amid the roar of weapons, the shouts and moans of battle between those fighting in glamorous armor, with a huge shield.

Hermes God of Trade – Full Myth, Greek Mythology

Hermes God of Trade – Full Myth, Greek Mythology

The god Hermes, the messenger of the gods, the son of Zeus and Maya, was born in a cave on Mount Kylena in Arcadia. He travels with the speed of thought from Olympus to the farthest end of the world thanks to his winged sandals, with a caduceus in his hand. Hermes guards the roads and the hermes dedicated to him can be seen placed along roads, at crossroads and at the entrances of houses, everywhere in ancient Greece.

What can you find here?

In this blog you can find mythology, legends, stories and culture from all around the world.
The main line is your interest in how your imagination will take you on a journey throughout that does interest you in the story department – from fictional to fact-based.

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The main purpose here is… reading and Imagination (with a capital letter).
My belief is that Reasoning and Imagination are the perfect spectre of harmony if used correctly for a human being that wants to excel in whatever category in Life. And books, factional or fictional, can give that richness.
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There are a lot of ideas that comes to mind which direction to take.
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