Greek Mythology Articles

Meleager – Son of Ares and the Boar

Meleager is the son of the Chaldean king Oeneus, but according to some legends, his real father was Ares, the god of war. At the age of seven, the mighty moirs predicted Meleager's death. She became famous for racing Atalanta in a race, and when, in gratitude to all...

Fall of Icarus and Flight of Daedalus

Daedalus (Δαίδαλος, Daedalos) is an Athenian architect, sculptor and artist, whose name literally means "skillful master". Son of Euphalamus and Meropa (daughter of Erechtheus - Myth of Erechtheus here), and his descendant was the ancient philosopher Socrates....

Procne and Philomela – Revenge Upon Lustful Tereus

Procne (Πρόκνη, Próknē) is the eldest daughter of the Athenian king Pandion, wife of King Tereus of Thrace, and her sister is Philomela. Philomela is raped by Tereus, who cuts off her tongue and she, in turn, weaves a tapestry depicting everything to reveal the crime,...

Boreas – The Fearful God of Wind Lustfully Abducts Oritia

Boreas is the son of the titan Astrea and the goddess of the dawn Eos (myth of Eos here), and his name (Βορέας) means "northern" because he is the god of the north wind. He inhabited Thrace and was glorified as a rebellious deity, and when he met Oritia, he swore...
Perseus, Atlas and Andromeda Myths

Perseus, Atlas and Andromeda Myths

Perseus is moving further and further away from the island of the Gorgons. He flies across the sky like a cloud driven by a strong wind. He finally reached the country where the titan’s son Iapetus, Prometheus’ brother, the giant Atlas, reigned. Thousands of flocks of fine-wooled sheep and whirling cows and bulls grazed the Atlas fields. Magnificent orchards stretched across his estates, and among the gardens was a tree with golden branches and leaves; and the apples that this tree yielded were also golden. Atlas guarded this tree like the apple of his eye; it was his greatest treasure. The goddess Themis foretold him that one day a son of Zeus would come to him and steal his golden apples. Atlas was afraid of that. He surrounded the orchard where the golden tree grew with a high wall, and placed a dragon in front of the entrance as a guard, spewing flames. Atlas did not allow foreigners into his possessions – he feared that a son of Zeus would penetrate between them. Here that Perseus flew to Atlas with his winged sandals and addressed him with such welcoming words:

read more
Danaus, Aegyptus and the Danaides

Danaus, Aegyptus and the Danaides

The son of Zeus and Io, Epaphus, had a son, Bell, and he had two sons, Aegyptus and Danaus. Aegyptus ruled the whole country, which the blessed Nile irrigated; in his name this country was also called Aegyptus. Danaus ruled in Libya. The gods gave Aegyptus fifty sons...

read more
Aeacus – Judge of the Underworld

Aeacus – Judge of the Underworld

Zeus the Thunderer, after kidnapping the beautiful daughter of the river god Azop, took her to the island of Oynopia, which has since been named after Azop’s daughter Aegina. The son of Aegina and Zeus, Aeacus, was born on this island. When Aeacus grew up, matured, and became king on the island of Aegina, no one in all of Greece could compare to him in love of truth or justice. The great Olympians themselves revered Aeacus and often chose him as a judge in their disputes. After his death, Aeacus, like Minos and Radamant, became a judge in the underworld by the will of the gods.

read more
Pandora’s Box and Merciless Consequences

Pandora’s Box and Merciless Consequences

When Prometheus stole the divine fire for mortals, taught them various arts and crafts and gave them knowledge, life on earth became happier. Zeus, angered by Prometheus’ actions, punished him severely and sent evil to the people. He commanded the glorious god, the blacksmith Hephaestus, to mix earth and water, and to make of this mixture a beautiful girl equal in power to men, to have a gentle voice and a gaze similar to that of the immortal goddesses. Zeus’ daughter Athena was to weave a beautiful garment for the girl; the goddess of love, the golden Aphrodite, was to give her a charm that no one could resist; Hermes to give her a cunning mind and dexterity.

read more
The Great Flood in Greek Mythology – Myth

The Great Flood in Greek Mythology – Myth

Many crimes were committed by the people of the Copper Age. Arrogant and wicked, they did not obey the Olympian gods. The thunderbolt Zeus was angry with them; Zeus was especially angry with the king of Lycosura in Arcadia, Lycaon. Once Zeus came to Lycosura as an ordinary mortal. In order for the inhabitants of Lycosura to know that he was a god, Zeus gave them a sign and all the inhabitants fell prostrate before him and worshiped him as a god. Only Lycaon did not want to give Zeus divine honors and ridiculed all who worshiped Zeus. Lycaon decided to test whether Zeus was a god. He killed a hostage who was in his palace, boiled part of his body, burned another part and offered them to the great thunderbolt to eat. Zeus was terribly angry. With a flash of lightning, he destroyed Lycaon’s palace and turned it into a bloodthirsty wolf.

read more
Five Ages of Man – Greek Mythology

Five Ages of Man – Greek Mythology

The immortal gods living on the bright Olympus created the first human race happy; this was the Golden Age. Then the god Cronus ruled in the sky. In those days, people lived like the blessed gods, knowing neither worries, nor labor, nor sorrow. They did not know the weak old age either; their legs and arms were always strong and sturdy. Their life, without disease and full of happiness, was like an eternal feast. Their death, which came after a long life, was like a peaceful, quiet sleep.

read more

Pin It on Pinterest