Greek Mythology Articles

Aeacus – Judge of the Underworld

Zeus the Thunderer, after kidnapping the beautiful daughter of the river god Azop, took her to the island of Oynopia, which has since been named after Azop’s daughter Aegina. The son of Aegina and Zeus, Aeacus, was born on this island. When Aeacus grew up, matured, and became king on the island of Aegina, no one in all of Greece could compare to him in love of truth or justice. The great Olympians themselves revered Aeacus and often chose him as a judge in their disputes. After his death, Aeacus, like Minos and Radamant, became a judge in the underworld by the will of the gods.

Pandora – Creation and Pandora Box

When Prometheus stole the divine fire for mortals, taught them various arts and crafts and gave them knowledge, life on earth became happier. Zeus, angered by Prometheus’ actions, punished him severely and sent evil to the people. He commanded the glorious god, the blacksmith Hephaestus, to mix earth and water, and to make of this mixture a beautiful girl equal in power to men, to have a gentle voice and a gaze similar to that of the immortal goddesses. Zeus’ daughter Athena was to weave a beautiful garment for the girl; the goddess of love, the golden Aphrodite, was to give her a charm that no one could resist; Hermes to give her a cunning mind and dexterity.

The Great Flood in Greek Mythology – Myth

Many crimes were committed by the people of the Copper Age. Arrogant and wicked, they did not obey the Olympian gods. The thunderbolt Zeus was angry with them; Zeus was especially angry with the king of Lycosura in Arcadia, Lycaon. Once Zeus came to Lycosura as an ordinary mortal. In order for the inhabitants of Lycosura to know that he was a god, Zeus gave them a sign and all the inhabitants fell prostrate before him and worshiped him as a god. Only Lycaon did not want to give Zeus divine honors and ridiculed all who worshiped Zeus. Lycaon decided to test whether Zeus was a god. He killed a hostage who was in his palace, boiled part of his body, burned another part and offered them to the great thunderbolt to eat. Zeus was terribly angry. With a flash of lightning, he destroyed Lycaon’s palace and turned it into a bloodthirsty wolf.

Five Ages of Man – Greek Mythology

The immortal gods living on the bright Olympus created the first human race happy; this was the Golden Age. Then the god Cronus ruled in the sky. In those days, people lived like the blessed gods, knowing neither worries, nor labor, nor sorrow. They did not know the weak old age either; their legs and arms were always strong and sturdy. Their life, without disease and full of happiness, was like an eternal feast. Their death, which came after a long life, was like a peaceful, quiet sleep.

Pandora – Creation and Pandora Box

When Prometheus stole the divine fire for mortals, taught them various arts and crafts and gave them knowledge, life on earth became happier. Zeus, angered by Prometheus’ actions, punished him severely and sent evil to the people. He commanded the glorious god, the blacksmith Hephaestus, to mix earth and water, and to make of this mixture a beautiful girl equal in power to men, to have a gentle voice and a gaze similar to that of the immortal goddesses. Zeus’ daughter Athena was to weave a beautiful garment for the girl; the goddess of love, the golden Aphrodite, was to give her a charm that no one could resist; Hermes to give her a cunning mind and dexterity.

The Great Flood in Greek Mythology – Myth

Many crimes were committed by the people of the Copper Age. Arrogant and wicked, they did not obey the Olympian gods. The thunderbolt Zeus was angry with them; Zeus was especially angry with the king of Lycosura in Arcadia, Lycaon. Once Zeus came to Lycosura as an ordinary mortal. In order for the inhabitants of Lycosura to know that he was a god, Zeus gave them a sign and all the inhabitants fell prostrate before him and worshiped him as a god. Only Lycaon did not want to give Zeus divine honors and ridiculed all who worshiped Zeus. Lycaon decided to test whether Zeus was a god. He killed a hostage who was in his palace, boiled part of his body, burned another part and offered them to the great thunderbolt to eat. Zeus was terribly angry. With a flash of lightning, he destroyed Lycaon’s palace and turned it into a bloodthirsty wolf.

Five Ages of Man – Greek Mythology

The immortal gods living on the bright Olympus created the first human race happy; this was the Golden Age. Then the god Cronus ruled in the sky. In those days, people lived like the blessed gods, knowing neither worries, nor labor, nor sorrow. They did not know the weak old age either; their legs and arms were always strong and sturdy. Their life, without disease and full of happiness, was like an eternal feast. Their death, which came after a long life, was like a peaceful, quiet sleep.

Punishment of Dionysus

Punishment of Dionysus

And in Orchomenus, in Boeotia, they did not want to recognize the god Dionysus. When the priest of Dionysus (Bacchus) appeared in Orchomenus and called on all the girls and women to go to the forests and mountains in merry mourning in honor of the god of wine, the three daughters of King Minyas refused to go to the feast: they did not want to recognize Dionysus for god. All the women of Orchomenus went out of the city into the shady forests and there sang and danced to celebrate the great god.

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Apollo and Daphne Myth

Apollo and Daphne Myth

The bright, cheerful god Apollo also knows sorrow: misfortune befell him too. He knew the grief soon after his victory over Python. When Apollo, proud to have defeated Python, stood over the monster defeated by his arrows, he saw the young god of love, Eros, stretching his golden bow. Apollo told him with a laugh:

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Apollo’s Punishment – Giants and Satyr

Apollo’s Punishment – Giants and Satyr

The long-range Apollo is frightening when he gets angry, and then there is no mercy of with his golden arrows. They killed many. From them perished the proud Otos and Ephialtes, sons of Aloadae, who did not want to obey anyone. From an early age, they were famous for their enormous height, strength and boundless courage. As young men, Otto and Ephialtes began to threaten the Olympian gods:

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God Pan – God of the Forest – Greek Myth

God Pan – God of the Forest – Greek Myth

The god Pan could often be seen in the midst of Dionysus’ entourage. When the great Pan was born, his mother, the nymph Driopa, looked at her son, terrified, and fled. He was born with goat’s legs and horns and a long beard. But his father, Hermes, rejoiced that a son had been born to him, took him in his arms, and carried him to the bright Olympus and the gods. All the gods rejoiced loudly at the birth of Pan and laughed as they watched him.

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King Midas and His Golden Curse – Greek Mythology

King Midas and His Golden Curse – Greek Mythology

Once the merry Dionysus with a noisy crowd of maenads and satyrs wandered on the tree-covered rocks of Tmol in Phrygia. Only Strong was missing from his entourage. He stayed behind and stumbled at every step, because he was quite drunk, wandering the Phrygian fields. The villagers saw him, tied him with garlands of flowers and took him to King Midas. Midas immediately recognized Dionysus’ teacher, received him respectfully in his palace, and celebrated him with lavish feasts for nine days in a row. On the tenth day, Midas personally took Strong to the god Dionysus. Dionysus rejoiced to see Strong, and allowed Midas, as a reward for the respect he had shown his teacher, to choose the gift he wanted. Then Midas shouted:

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Phaeton – Son of the God Helios and Sun’s Chariot

Phaeton – Son of the God Helios and Sun’s Chariot

Only once was the established order in the world challenged, and the sun-god did not go out in his chariot to heaven to shine upon men. This is what happened. The Sun, Helios, had a son by Clemena, the daughter of the sea goddess Thetis, who was called Phaeton. Phaeton’s cousin Epaphus, the son of the thunderer Zeus, once laughed at him, telling him:

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Night, Moon, Dawn and Sun – Greek Myth

Night, Moon, Dawn and Sun – Greek Myth

Slowly travels across the sky in her chariot, drawn by black horses, the goddess Night – Nukta. With her dark veil she has swept the earth. Darkness has enveloped everything. Near the chariot of the goddess Night the stars are crowded and an uncertain flickering light pours on the earth – these are the young sons of the goddess Dawn – Eos, and of Astrey.

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Triptolemus and Erysichthon – Demeter’s Blessed and Cursed

Triptolemus and Erysichthon – Demeter’s Blessed and Cursed

The great goddess Demeter, who gives fertility to the earth, taught people how to cultivate fertile fields. She gave the young son of the Eleusinian king, Triptolemus, wheat seeds, and he first plowed the Rary field near Eleusis with a plow three times and threw the seeds into the dark earth. A rich harvest yielded the fields blessed by Demeter herself. In a wonderful chariot drawn by the wings of dragons, Triptolemus, by order of Demeter, flew around all the countries and taught people agriculture everywhere.

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