Greek Mythology Articles

The Myth of the Muses – Inspiration in the Ancient World

The famous inspiration goddesses, the Muses (Μοῦσαι, Moûsai, Μόσες, Múses), are patrons of poetry, the arts, and science. Their leader is Apollo. According to the Boeotian (Thracian) tradition, they were originally worshiped by the giants Oth and Ephialtes, worshiping three muses: Meleta (μελετη – “learning, experience”), Mnema (μνιμη – memory) and Aoida (ωδή – “song”).

God of Medicine Asclepius

Asclepius/Aesculapius is the god of medicine, son of Apollo and the nymph Coronida (according to the writer Apollodorus is Arsinoea, great-granddaughter of Perseus, and according to others only of Apollo), his daughters are the “Asclepiades” – Hygeia (“Health”), Jaso (” treatment, recovery from illness”), Aceso (“treatment, healing process”), Aegle (goddess of good health) and Panacea (goddess of universal medicine).

King Priam – Aesacus and Hesperia

Aesacus was the son of the Trojan king Priam and the brother of the great hero Hector. He was born on the slopes of Mount Ida by the lovely nymph Alexiroya, the daughter of the river god Granik. Growing up in the mountains, Aesacus disliked the city and avoided living...

Sons Of Zeus – The Dioscuri Castor And Pollux

Dioscuri translated from ancient Greek (Διόσκουροι) means "sons of Zeus", and that is what the twins Castor (Κάστωρ) and Pollux (Πολυδεύκης) were called. Their sisters are the notorious Beautiful Helen, Clytemnestra, and they are all children of Leda and the Spartan...
Cadmus – The Dragon Killer

Cadmus – The Dragon Killer

Cadmus (Κάδμος) is the son of the Phoenician king Agenor and the brother of Europe (the myth of Europe here). Cadmus is the founder of the city of Thebes, the acropolis is named after him - Cadmea. The historian Herodotus mentions Cadmus as a person who introduced the...

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Perseus, Atlas and Andromeda Myths

Perseus, Atlas and Andromeda Myths

Perseus is moving further and further away from the island of the Gorgons. He flies across the sky like a cloud driven by a strong wind. He finally reached the country where the titan’s son Iapetus, Prometheus’ brother, the giant Atlas, reigned. Thousands of flocks of fine-wooled sheep and whirling cows and bulls grazed the Atlas fields. Magnificent orchards stretched across his estates, and among the gardens was a tree with golden branches and leaves; and the apples that this tree yielded were also golden. Atlas guarded this tree like the apple of his eye; it was his greatest treasure. The goddess Themis foretold him that one day a son of Zeus would come to him and steal his golden apples. Atlas was afraid of that. He surrounded the orchard where the golden tree grew with a high wall, and placed a dragon in front of the entrance as a guard, spewing flames. Atlas did not allow foreigners into his possessions – he feared that a son of Zeus would penetrate between them. Here that Perseus flew to Atlas with his winged sandals and addressed him with such welcoming words:

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Pandora’s Box and Merciless Consequences

Pandora’s Box and Merciless Consequences

When Prometheus stole the divine fire for mortals, taught them various arts and crafts and gave them knowledge, life on earth became happier. Zeus, angered by Prometheus’ actions, punished him severely and sent evil to the people. He commanded the glorious god, the blacksmith Hephaestus, to mix earth and water, and to make of this mixture a beautiful girl equal in power to men, to have a gentle voice and a gaze similar to that of the immortal goddesses. Zeus’ daughter Athena was to weave a beautiful garment for the girl; the goddess of love, the golden Aphrodite, was to give her a charm that no one could resist; Hermes to give her a cunning mind and dexterity.

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